Now you probably wouldn't want to search the definition of tea bagging on Google as there is likely a chance of a "not so safe for work" image coming up on your screen. Or it might tarnish your immaculate search history. But don't fret. We are going to explain what "teabagging" is all about!

Teabagging in online games has become part of an unspoken language or even an emote - a way to identify the worst people online. Pulling this showboating move off is simple enough: you just stand over an unconscious enemy and press that crouch over and over their face repeatedly, like a dancing baby. 

I play a lot of online games, ranging from Fighting, Shooting, RTS and MMORPG, and once in a while, I would be exposed to the so called "Teabagging" within all those genres. However, only recently have I noticed more and more of it online, through streams and public tournaments.

Some players would take it as an insult, some take it as another means of taunting and others think of it as a tool to psyche out their opponent. Whatever it may be, it is becoming a norm within the online world as a source of manual emoting. I doubt Blizzard or Capcom will be allowing the feature of "teabagging" anytime soon.

Punk is seen handing taking out a teabag and handing it to the one member of the crowd with his photo in it.

 

Take another video example. During the Capcom Tour, Du “NuckleDu” Dang, who is an professional gamer, taunts his opponent, with the commentators and public accepting it as the stream goes on. With NuckleDu coming out as the winner, his whole purpose of teabagging was to rile up the opponent and have a bit of fun.

Below is the snippet of this statement

Interviewer: Let’s talk a bit about psychology in these games. During Winners finals of your pool at Frosty, you and Gllty both engaged in some teabagging. But some of the most notable teabags that people have talked about came at the expense of Xiaohai. Is there a reason that you go after Xiaohai like that?

NuckleDu: Truth be told, Xiaohai is my favorite player. The fact that I’m able to teabag him and still win is amusing to me. He’s also a really emotional player, so whenever I do so, I know I’m doing mental damage to him. I would never teabag a random player. But on Xiaohai, definitely.

Interviewer: It’s more gamesmanship than anything?

NuckleDu: Right. When Gllty teabagged me, people asked me on Twitter if I was offended. No. When people do it back to me, I feel honored. They’re acknowledging my work. I would never be a poor sport about it. I like seeing it.

You can find the full interview courtesy of Shoryuken.com

Teabagging has become such a common thing, that big titles such as Killer Instinct have banned "Teabagging" during tournaments only to get online backlash, having then to accept it and being forced to claim the initial ban was just a "troll" statement.

"In game taunting of all kinds is allowed!" state the official rules. "As far as threatening other players outside or inside of KIWC there will be a absolute ZERO tolerance for this."

There are also some subtle patch changes to Overwatch to update the Cooldowns for repetitive quick motion for crouching. I will leave that to you to decide if that was intended or not.

What do you think? Is it insulting? Trolling? Strategic? All we know is that it has spread like the plague throughout all games.

 

 

A very passionate gamer who grew up in Sydney. A father with a wife and two kids. Professionally, an IT engineer with over 10 years experience. I like web design, cars, and adrenaline sports. I am especially interested in eSports. My vision is for professional gaming to one day be accepted and recognised as a highly respected profession. Let's make it happen!